Fruit Tree Bud Study

Peach

In the last week, this area has seen two wet snow storms, followed in short order by several days in the 70's.  That's our definition of a proper Spring.  We had hoped the little bit of moisture would hold off fire season, but the first wildfire cropped up today.  On a happier note, I took a walk with my Familiar and had a look at the fruit trees and shrubs in my neighborhood.  It was really interesting to study them all at this stage of late winter growth.

 
Hawthorn
Pear
Rose
 
Apricot
Apple
Golden Currant (racing greyhounds)
Ditch plum
Crab Apple
My favorite bud - Kitteh

Comments

  1. I hate to even admit that I've never paid attention to tree buds. Are some of them fuzzy?

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    1. Yeah, some of them are sort of fuzzy. Isn't that neato? Just one more piece of the puzzle when you are learning to identify trees in winter.

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  2. Nice pictures, neat idea. Um, who is your Familiar? Kitteh?

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  3. I love these photo study posts you've been doing. I'd love to see more.

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    1. Thanks, Brian, that's good to know. I wondered if others would be as interested in these photos as I was.

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  4. I'm liking your blog so much from North Carolina!

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    1. That's so awesome to hear! What is your area like? I imagine it to be quite lovely and green.

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  5. The darling buds of may! We are the opposite here in Tassie Australia, we are nerine rich, dead brown grass rich and totally OVER summer rich and can't wait for our deciduous trees and shrubs to dump their leaves and get it over with so that we can step firmly into autumn and get a bit of respite from drought and heat. We can't wait for fires and hot soup and comforting hot chocolate and the future of buds is something we aren't ready to contemplate quite yet. Give us a few months and we will be back wondering about just where we should prune our fruit trees and how much lime sulphur to use to stop the dreaded peach leaf curl and wondering how much fruit those spurs are going to give us this year...for now I could care LESS about buds and am willing the weather to get colder so that I can light Brunhilda and slow cook beans :)

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    1. Aw, see, but that's what I love about having buddies in the other hemi - getting to get a glimpse of roasted veg when I'm dying of summer heat, and watching people pick fruit when I think that I can't bear another grey day. I also find it to be quite helpful when it comes to recipes planning. I hope your cool breezes bring relief soon, my friend.

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  6. Lovely post :)
    Must study my local plants more (all year) so I can recognize more buds...

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    1. It's something I've been working on the last two years. A friend was visiting a few months ago, and I was telling her how a particular apple tree produced apples that were grainy and pear-like, and she took a look at the tree and said, "oh well, this looks like a pear tree." Then she took a branch, looked at a bud and said, "no, I was wrong, this bud is fuzzy so it's an apple." She has a lot of experience working in orchards, but for me it was as if she'd done a magic trick.

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  7. I see the greyhounds too!!!!

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  8. Love this, Butter... I second the more pictures thing :).

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  9. I enjoy the picture studies as well. There is so much information to be gained.

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    1. Having photos on the blog makes a nice record for me. I've found it helpful to revisit photos from the past.

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