Wild Things in January - Tea


How about we welcome the brand spankin' new year of 2013 by featuring teas for Wild Things in January?  No doubt the new year is all tuckered out from all of that partying, and could use a nice cuppa tea.

This month is wide open, feel free to interpret tea (properly called tisanes in the cases of most wildcrafted brews) as broadly as you please.  Share your tastiest concoction, or one that you use for a particular medical condition.  Just keep in mind that at least one major ingredient in your blend needs to have been harvested from the wild.

I'd really like to stress that Wild Things isn't only for fancy recipes and/or bloggers.  Our monthly collection of recipes is meant to feature the wild foods that all manner of people use in their own homes.  This is a place meant to inspire, not to intimidate.  You, yes you!, are invited to participate.  Share your experiences with foraged foods, whether you are experienced or a newb.

If you have a blog or website, please send me a link to the page featuring your recipe before the end of the month (soon is better!).  If you don't have a blog, don't worry!  Just send me your recipe, along with a paragraph introducing/describing it, and a picture (horizontally framed is best, but not critical) if possible.  All entries should be sent to wildthings.roundup@gmail.com (please please please, I will continue to beg, don't send entries to my other email accounts or message them to me, as they tend to get lost).

The tea blend shown in the above photo is from my friend at the Painted Cave Apothecary.

Are you new to Wild Things?  Here's the scoop.

In many countries, traditional foods are prepared for their medicinal effects. In most of these places, the foods prepared were wild foods that were cheap and easy to obtain. By default, they were local and seasonal. One of the problems with a lot of modern fad diets is that in order to actually follow the diet, one needs to fork out a whole lot of money. Most of us just can't afford to do that, especially not in this economy! Not only that, but it seems might suspicious that, in many cases, these products that are touted as panaceas have to come from half way around the globe -- noni from Tahiti, acai from Brazil, gogii from China. What are the odds that God (or the higher being of your choice) put all of the good stuff in Tahiti, and left us to fend for ourselves until the advent of globalization? Whether food or medicine, the majority of what we need can be found locally. It might not be trendy, but it will most probably be just as effective, if not more so. Wherever you are, you have with your reach an untapped resource - wild foods!
Welcome to the Wild Things Round Up*
As your host, I'd like to demonstrate that eating wild foods doesn't need to be a terrifying endeavor, and that our health and our diet needn't be dictated by financial status or geographic location.

A Few Notes About the Round Up
1. Wherever you are, you have access to Wild Things, even if this means clandestine trips to your neighbor's yard in the middle of the night**.

2. Foraging isn't only for hippies and luddites, though hippies and luddites are both very much welcome (Hi, Hippie!  Hi, Luddite!). It's easy to assume that everyone who eats this way lives out in the wild, and shuns the material world and/or technology. But it just isn't true! This isn't a club exclusive to country mice. I live smack in the middle of suburbia. I'm a very well adjusted modern woman who loves my life, and happen to love nature as well.

3.  This is not about trying to be a cave dweller. Though there are plenty of people in the world who successfully and gracefully live a life that is more similar to how people lived hundreds, or even thousands of years ago. I'm not one of those people, and I'll assume that for the most part, you are not either.  It's easy to romanticize, but that is a difficult, hard working life. It's also not necessary to remove yourself from the modern world in order to be connected to nature. When it comes down to it, isn't that what we all want a bit more of -- connection, to nature, to community, to other people, to a higher power? Nature is everywhere. Life is everywhere. It's not outside of your touch. It's not only available to people who sacrifice modern convenience. You do not need to give up your makeup or latte.

A Few Foraging Rules

1. DO NOT EAT ANYTHING THAT YOU CANNOT 100% IDENTIFY!!! I can't stress the importance of this point. People can die from this sort of stupidity. Let's not win any Darwin Awards here.

2.  Know the foraging laws in your area. Call the city, call the forest service, call the landowner.   Respect private property. Ask permission. Most people will gladly let you pull up some weeds for them. Most of them are delighted to get rid of some of the fruit that rots all over the pavement. Just ask.

3.  Don't take more than you need. Never take rare plants. Learn what's in your area -- only take things what are abundant. This is important! Always think of the future, not just in terms of what you want, but in terms of the ecology of the system from which you are harvesting. These ecosystems have been around for millenia, since long before people got there. Don't be the one to change that in one generation.

Tools You Will Need

1. Scissors and/or pocket knife

2. A local guidebook (don't be tempted to grab a national guide), with pictures

3. Bags for collecting food

How to Play

At the beginning of each month, I will introduce a new Wild Thing. I will give pictures, descriptions, best locations, and taste, and also list any possible toxicity issues. The plants that I feature will be those with few, if any, toxic lookalikes. And if there are any, I'll give you ample warning. None of the plants I select will have any potential lethal lookalikes.

Over the course of the month, both you and I will go and find the featured plant, play with it in the kitchen, and come up with creative ways to use it. But don't feel like you need to invent a recipe in order to participate. Feel free to tell about your experience using a known recipe. But please do credit the originator of the recipe.

If you have a blog, post your recipe on your blog, and then share it with Wild Things. Also, mine your archives, and link old recipes.

If you don't have a blog, you are still welcome to participate. Simply introduce your recipe and experience with a few sentences, and then share your recipe. A picture is always nice, too, although not necessary to play along.

Before the end of the month (sooner is better, because your host has a day job!), submit your recipe to wildthings.roundup@gmail.com . Please send your recipe directly to that email address. If you send it to my personal email, or post it on Facebook, I'm likely to forget it.
At the end of the month, I will provide a round up list of everyone's adventures. Sound like fun?  I think so.
*No association with Monsanto.

** Just kidding.  I don't advocate stealing. Really, there's no need -- a knock on the door and a "Hey, I noticed that you have an apple tree full of rotting apples. I was wondering, could I take a few of them, or pay you for some of them, or mow your lawn for some of them?" will suffice. Most people are horrified at the thought of taking money for apples, and will drop big bags of them off on your front step for months to come.


Comments

  1. I would love to take part in this most interesting experiment in sharing knowledge, information and people's personal takes on how to prepare specific ingredients that have been foraged. I live in Tasmania Australia and doubt that many of your natives will be just growing adventitiously in our local environment BUT in saying that...it might be a wonderful challenge to see if I can't source at least some of them...

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    Replies
    1. People from all over the world participate in Wild Things! It's all about taking advantage of what is abundant in your own area. I'd be so interested to see what you made.

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  2. Now, this is something I do a lot. I might participate for the first time this month!

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  3. Does pine needle tea count?

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    Replies
    1. Yup, pine needle tea counts. What species do you use?

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  4. Great to find your blog. Sue from Couscous & Consciousness sent me a link. I'm in Wellington, New Zealand, and I never leave the house without my gardening gloves, snippers and a plastic bag. Looking forward to some foraging adventures with you.

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  5. Well, that gave me a smile. Sue and Sue. Lovely to think of Sue from C&C, and equally pleasant to meet you. I had a lot of fun seeing all of the gorgeous things growing in your garden right now. Warmed me right up!

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  6. I've seen some recipes lately using acorns. Can any kind of acorns be used or are only certain kinds of acorns suitable for cooking?

    I don't know the different varieties of oak trees growing here in Houston but there are lots of fallen acorns around for easy gathering. (Away from roadways & pissing/pooping animals, right?! Learning rules of foraging!)

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  7. If you're interested in learning about harvesting and preparing acorns, you're not going to find better information than in Sam Thayer's entry in Nature's Garden. Once you read that, have a look at my Wild Things from November 2011, which featured acorns, and you'll find lots of great recipes for cooking with them.

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