Sunflower Seed Cakes

My friend Alex, at a Moderate Life, reminded me that we can take all sorts of valuable information from relationships we've had, even the failed ones. Such is the case regarding a long-ago failed relationship that I had (if you don't know the definition of beard, then look it up and have a good chuckle at my expense). I stayed in that relationship far longer than I should have because he had a really big family, something I've always dreamed about. I particularly enjoyed spending time in the kitchen with his sisters, who taught me many of their family recipes, handed down from generation to generation, with roots reaching back in this land before it was even known as America.

I knew these gals back when I was still eyeball deep in my low-fat days, so their recipes, which didn't shy away from fat, and called heavily upon wild foods, didn't seem like something which could be an everyday part of my life. But it occurred to me recently that a lot of those recipes align very well with the way I eat today. They're mostly wheat free which is exactly what I need as a celiac. And as someone who forages, it makes perfect sense to utilize recipes from the people who walked this land before me.

And so, I'll presenting some of these recipes in the near future. I'll make no claim at authenticity, as always. The recipes are being filtered through many years and my imagination, but the spirit of them remains intact.

These sunflower seed cakes could not be simpler. They use just three ingredients, and are very economical to make. As I recall, they were served with vegetable soups, but they also make a perfect snack. For every cup of raw unsoaked sunflower seeds, you'll need a half teaspoon of maple syrup, and a heaping tablespoon of cornmeal, multiply the recipe as needed.

Soak your sunflower seeds overnight in good water and a heavy pinch of salt. Drain the water from the seeds, and place them into a food processor. Pulse the seeds, scraping down the sides, until a thick paste forms. Add the maple syrup and cornmeal, and continue to pulse until well blended. If the dough won't hold together to form a patty, then add a touch of water.

Using wet hands, form golf ball sized pieces of dough into patties, and fry over medium heat until golden on both sides. Dust with salt after you've taken them from the pan. You won't believe how well these little sun cakes hold together. I think you'll also be surprised by just how tasty and light they are - the interior, sweet and rich, and the outside fried up brown and crunchy.


I'm sharing this recipe with Pennywise Platter Thursday at the Nourishing Gourmet, and Foodie Friday at Designs by Gollum, Vegetarian Foodie Friday at Breastfeeding Moms Unite, and Fight Back Friday at Food Renegade. Please support other great food bloggers by checking out the link.

Comments

  1. Hey Butter, Thanks so much for the mention. I am always amazed at what comes out of my mouth that people actually remember! Your ability to remember these recipes really is a blessing as you could easily have just discounted them due to your previous nutritional protocol. I do adore sunflower seeds and made a version of these in my raw vegan days in the dehydrator. Your way sounds much better and I am really looking forward to seeing some of the other recipes you will share! :) hugs! alex

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  2. These would be so perfect for my Vegetarian Foodie Fridays if it weren't for the lard. I wonder what these would be like in coconut oil? Butter? Olive oil? They're very pretty with the sunflowers! :)

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  3. These sound deliciously simple. I love native American food. Fry bread.... mmmmmm. I've gotta give these a try. Thanks for sharing!

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  4. Hi, I linked over from Pennywise. These look so good and I bet they are really filling. I'll have to try them out on my kids.

    http://nurturedfamilylife.blogspost.com

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  5. These sound so incredibly tasty and I love the minimalist ingredient list! What an interesting flavor combo!

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  6. These sound really great!
    Thanks for stopping by this week. Have a wonderful weekend :-)

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  7. These look so great butter...I m gonna try it soon:)

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  8. Mel - I actually had a hard time making them look pretty :) I made them with blue cornmeal, so the overall effect was very grey. But they taste so good!

    Lisa - These are very kid friendly because they're the perfect size to hold and they're mildly sweet. You can also add dried fruit to the mix.

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  9. You are so sweet!! Thanks for posting at VFF! :)

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  10. Just made these! Yummy! Even my terribly picky husband liked them. Only thing I did differently was I fried them in coconut oil - they were delish! Thanks :)

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  11. Sarah - I'm so excited that you liked this recipe, and knowing that your picky husband likes them is proof that they've got a broad appeal. If I could just put one of these sweet and crunchy little cakes into more people's hands, I just know they'd love them.

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  12. What a great recipe - and a great story! I love recipes that have been handed down through the generations!

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  13. Thanks Deanna. Recipes with a good backstory or history are always my favorite, too :)

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  14. Hi,
    This post is so informative. I would love for you to come
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    put FAT TUESDAY on your list of carnivals to visit
    and link to each week!

    http://realfoodforager.com/2011/09/fat-tuesday-september-20-2011/

    ReplyDelete

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