Every Trip is a Foraging Trip

I just read about someone in my area who went out foraging and came home empty handed. I had to laugh because it's August, high summer, and food is everywhere you look. You can't take a step without stumbling upon food. These days, even the simplest trip turns into a foraging adventure for me - every walk, every bike ride, every stop along the road. And that's as it should be. Foraging is no longer a separate and distinct compartment in my life, it's as integrated into my daily activities as breathing. When I'm out and about, my eyes naturally scan the area for food.

Just take a look at what I saw the other day while in the mountains. In addition to the wild onions I featured, I found a wide variety of fruit, from red currants to chokecherries. And I also found the biggest reddest juiciest thimbleberries I've ever seen. These ones were fed by a drainage, and were positively plump compared to the ones I had before, and their flavor was far more berry-like as well.

I also came across what, at the time, I thought were monarch caterpillars, since they were feeding on milkweed plants. But after a little research, it seems more likely that they were milkweed tussock caterpillars. Does anyone know if they are edible? They were plentiful, but very fuzzy.

I also saw a rafter of turkeys, at least 30 of them. But by the time I ran back up the hill to take a picture, they were fleeing. If anyone is interested in seeing a blurry picture of turkeys, I'd be happy to post it (bwwwaaaaa, autofocus!). Now there's a tasty wild edible I'd love to cook up!

Comments

  1. That person probably just didn't know what to look for. You with your practiced eye..YOU know.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I can't wait to get my eye even more practice :) This is really just my first year learning about foraging. Next year, I will be so much better prepared to take advantage of the growing season. Next year, I'll know where to look for morels before they come up, and I'll already know the best way to harvest cattail pollen (it took me nearly two weeks to get my method down).

    ReplyDelete
  3. hey thanks dear for choosing my entry for ur blog hop...i m truly honoured and appreciate it...first time here and u hv a lovely space and so creative u r.love this post with amazing pics..simply mindblowing...happy to follow u>>>>>>>>

    ReplyDelete
  4. So I went back and read all your foraging posts - fried dandelion flowers? Eating the buds? mushrooms and wild asparagus? I wish my dad had a nose like yours! Do you recommend a particular book to know what/how to forage? I am so intrigued. I would need great pictures because I am seriously allergic to poison ivy and still can't recognize the dumb plant. ;o)
    Oh, and I think they ate caterpillars in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom - so I think you are safe to eat those! LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Christy- I'd recommend that you go to your library and find a book specific to your area. I've gotten the most mileage out of a book called Best-Tasting Wild Plants of Colorado and the Rockies. Look for a book with good pictures of the plants in several stages of life - from just emerging to full maturity, including flowers and fruit. It's helpful if it contains descriptions of look-alikes, so that you can cross-reference if in doubt. And also, make sure your book has a section containing pictures of poisonous plants. I think it's far more important to be familiar with the few plants which are poisonous in your area, than all the things which are edible.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Butter! I am laughing at your comment on the catepillars because NOOO they taste NASTY! You can tell that by their brightly colored plummage~ I had someone run to my mother's house the other day with a luna moth catepillar and I was THRILLED I love to see the catepillars before the winged creatures! As for your foraging...keep it up sister!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Nooo? I think the fuzz would have stopped me anyhow, but I'm still on the lookout for bugs to eat! Areas just south of me have had a grasshopper infestation this year, and I sure would love to toast up a pot of those. I love spicy grasshoppers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love this time of year. Every walk out is like a treasure hunt and I never go without a bag or two. I have a couple of wild food books and have been incorporating more of it into my every day cooking. Not only does it taste wonderful but there is also that exciting feeling of, it isn't like you have gotten away with something, but it almost is.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I agree even-star, there is something about foraging that feels like a treasure hunt. I guess like any type of hunting, it taps into something primal.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts